Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark

Last updated: Jan 7, 2024

The video is about a study that examines the inheritance of social status over 400 years in England, using data from 425,000 people linked by descent and marriage. The study finds that there is a strong correlation between social status and genetics, with people who share more genes having a higher likelihood of having similar social outcomes. The study also finds that this correlation has not changed over the course of 400 years, suggesting that social mobility is limited. The study uses data from lineage societies, such as the Guild of Freemen, to track genealogy over time, but does not have direct genetic evidence. The study also examines other features of inheritance of status, such as the influence of mothers and fathers on children's outcomes, and finds that mothers and fathers play an equal role in social transmission.

This video by Chris Williamson was published on Jan 6, 2024.
Video length: 01:27:14.

The video is about a study that examines the inheritance of social status over 400 years in England.

The study finds that there is a strong correlation between social status and genetics, with people who share more genes having a higher likelihood of having similar social outcomes. The study also finds that this correlation has not changed over the course of 400 years, suggesting that social mobility is limited. The study uses data from lineage societies, such as the Guild of Merchants, to track genealogy over time.

The study also examines other features of inheritance of status, such as the influence of mothers and fathers on children's outcomes, and finds that these are also consistent with genetic transmission.

  • The paper examines the inheritance of social status over 400 years in England.
  • The study uses data from 425,000 people linked by descent and marriage to track genealogy over time.
  • The study finds that there is a strong correlation between social status and genetics.
  • The correlation has not changed over the course of 400 years, suggesting that social mobility is limited.
  • The study examines the inheritance of social status, using data from lineage societies, such as the Guild of Freemen, to track genealogy over time.
  • The study finds that there is a very strong inheritance of status, much stronger than people conventionally believe.
  • The study finds that there is an underlying correlation that is really strong.
  • The data is just very consistent with a really simple model of genetic transmission.
  • The study examines other features of inheritance of status, such as the influence of mothers and fathers on children's outcomes, and finds that mothers and fathers play an equal role in social transmission.

Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark - YouTube

Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 001

Introduction

  • The paper examines the inheritance of social status over 400 years in England.
  • It uses data from 425,000 people linked by descent and marriage to track genealogy over time.
  • The study finds that there is a strong correlation between social status and genetics.
  • The correlation has not changed over the course of 400 years, suggesting that social mobility is limited.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 002

Inheritance of Status

  • The paper finds that there is a very strong inheritance of status, much stronger than people conventionally believe.
  • The study finds that there is an underlying correlation that is really strong.
  • The data is just very consistent with a really simple model of genetic transmission.
  • What matters is how many genes do we have in common that'll explain how much outcome we'll have in common.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 003

Methodology

  • The lineage stuff is straightforward but the only thing we can do here is we don't have direct genetic evidence.
  • The study uses data from lineage societies, such as the Guild of Freemen, to track genealogy over time.
  • The only thing we can do here is we don't have direct genetic evidence.
  • The study looks at had though is what would be the predictions of a genetic model of transmission.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 005

Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark - YouTube

Predictions of a Genetic Model of Transmission

  • The predictions of that model are very consistent with this data for England.
  • The predictions of that model are very consistent with this data for England.
  • The predictions of that model are very consistent with this data for England.
  • The predictions of that model are very consistent with this data for England.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 006

Other Features of Inheritance of Status

  • Mothers and fathers play an equal role in social transmission.
  • Mothers and fathers play an equal role in social transmission.
  • Mothers and fathers play an equal role in social transmission.
  • Mothers and fathers play an equal role in social transmission.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 007

Inheritance of Social Status

  • The study examines the inheritance of social status over 400 years in England, using data from 425,000 people linked by descent and marriage.
  • The study finds that there is a strong correlation between social status and genetics, with people who share more genes having a higher likelihood of having similar social outcomes.
  • The study also finds that this correlation has not changed over the course of 400 years, suggesting that social mobility is limited.
  • The study uses data from lineage societies, such as the Guild of Freemen, to track genealogy over time.
  • The study examines other features of inheritance of status, such as the influence of mothers and fathers on children's outcomes, and finds that mothers and fathers play an equal role in social transmission.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 008

Birth Order and Outcome

  • The study finds that birth order does not matter in terms of outcomes, except for one important outcome: wealth.
  • Fathers are much more influential than brothers in terms of wealth inheritance, as wealth tended to flow on the Patra line in England.
  • The study finds that the grandparents' wealth on the Patra line is the most important factor in predicting wealth outcomes.
  • The study finds that older children get more attention than younger children, but this does not matter in terms of social outcomes.
  • The study finds that birth order does not matter for almost every case, except for the top 1% of families in the 19th century.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 010

Family Size and Outcome

  • The study finds that family size has no effect on social outcomes, except for wealth.
  • The study finds that wealth declines for wealthier families with larger family sizes.
  • The study finds that there is enormous variation in family size, and this has no effect on social outcomes.
  • The study finds that family size does not matter for 99% of the population.
  • The study finds that wealth is the only aspect of family size that matters in terms of social outcomes.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 011

Meeting Parents and Influence

  • The study examines the influence of parents on children's outcomes, and finds that mothers and fathers play an equal role.
  • The study finds that parental death occurs at relatively early ages for some people in their 50s and 60s.
  • The study finds that about 10% of kids' fathers die before they are 10 years old.
  • The study finds that the correlation between children and their fathers as a function of parental death is not strong.
  • The study finds that meeting parents does not influence social outcomes.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 012

Introduction

  • The video is about a study that examines the inheritance of social status over 400 years in England.
  • The study uses data from 425,000 people linked by descent and marriage to track genealogy over time.
  • The study finds that there is a strong correlation between social status and genetics.
  • The study also finds that this correlation has not changed over the course of 400 years, suggesting that social mobility is limited.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 014

Measures of Social Status

  • The specific measures used in the study are did you go to higher education, literacy, and occupational status.
  • These measures are used to indicate social status, income level, and the quality of the neighborhood.
  • The study uses these measures to track social status at the street level.
  • The study finds that these measures tend to move closely together.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 015

Inheritance of Social Status

  • High status people tend to have more education, wealth, higher occupational status, and live in nicer neighborhoods.
  • They also tend to live longer.
  • The study suggests that there is an underlying kind of social abilities that people have and that this is being transmitted between generations.
  • Behavioral genetics seems to win out in this field, with most people not wanting to believe that simple genetic transmission plays an important role in social life.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 016

Variation within Families

  • There is a lot of variation within any family in terms of the outcomes for children.
  • Children's outcomes are no more correlated than between a parent and a child.
  • If you really believe strongly in cultural transmission, you would expect that siblings would show very strong correlations.
  • However, the study finds that siblings do not show strong correlations.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 017

Genetic Inheritance of Social Status

  • The study examines the inheritance of social status over 400 years in England, using data from 425,000 people linked by descent and marriage.
  • The study finds that there is a strong correlation between social status and genetics, with people who share more genes having a higher likelihood of having similar social outcomes.
  • The study also finds that this correlation has not changed over the course of 400 years, suggesting that social mobility is limited.
  • The study uses data from lineage societies, such as the Guild of Freemen, to track genealogy over time.
  • The study examines other features of inheritance of status, such as the influence of mothers and fathers on children's outcomes, and finds that mothers and fathers play an equal role in social transmission.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 019

Cultural Transmission of Social Status

  • The study finds that cultural transmission of social status is difficult to test because it is a loose form of explanation.
  • The study finds that the strongest thing is the fact of the way siblings vary within families and the fact that it is very hard to understand why a sibling number one is doing great while sibling number two is struggling.
  • The study finds that the genetic explanation of social inheritance and social status is ideologically unpopular because it implies a kind of relatively conservative social policy.
  • The study finds that the expenditures on schools and other things like that are not going to have that much effect in terms of social outcomes.
  • The study finds that people are worried immediately about what does that imply about the relative fertility of different groups in society and the implications of that.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 020

The Study

  • The study examines the inheritance of social status over 400 years in England.
  • It uses data from 425,000 people linked by descent and marriage.
  • The study finds a strong correlation between social status and genetics.
  • People who share more genes have a higher likelihood of having similar social outcomes.
  • The study also finds that this correlation has not changed over the course of 400 years, suggesting that social mobility is limited.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 021

The Inheritance of Social Status

  • The study uses data from lineage societies, such as the Guild of Freemen, to track genealogy over time.
  • It examines other features of inheritance of status, such as the influence of mothers and fathers on children's outcomes.
  • Mothers and fathers play an equal role in social transmission.
  • The study finds that social status is inherited, with children having a higher likelihood of having similar social outcomes if their parents have similar social status.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 023

The Consequences of Ignoring Genetic Implications

  • There are several consequences of ignoring the genetic implications of social status.
  • One consequence is that it can lead to a lack of understanding of the true causes of social outcomes.
  • It can also lead to a lack of recognition of the role of genetics in shaping social mobility.
  • Ignoring genetic implications can also lead to a lack of understanding of the limitations of social mobility.
  • It can also lead to a lack of recognition of the role of genetics in shaping social mobility.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 024

The Importance of Education

  • Education is widely regarded as the key to social mobility and advancement.
  • However, the empirical evidence that education improves people's lives is weak.
  • The amount of education people get has increased over time, but this has not led to significant improvements in people's lives.
  • The study shows that education is not a useful indicator of someone's future life outcomes.
  • The study also shows that the idea of universal social mobility through education is an illusion.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 025

Marriage Records and Social Status

  • Marriage records in England and Wales from 1837 onwards ask for the father's occupation, which effectively measures literacy.
  • Freelance amateur genealogists have recorded this data and set it up on a website, allowing for access to about 1.5 million records.
  • People are matching very closely in marriage, and this consistency is not changing in England from 1837 till now.
  • The underlying social status of the person being married is the most important factor in marriage, with huge social consequences.
  • High status people marry only high social abilities people, resulting in a widening distribution of abilities in society.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 026

Marriage Patterns and Social Mobility

  • The marriage pattern observed in Britain is driving the very slow social mobility.
  • If people were forced to marry at random, the rates of social mobility in British Society could almost double.
  • Redistribution strategy should be pushed towards mixing the social status of married partners within more.
  • Studies show that when people report their ideal marriage partner, women report more about income or education, while men report more about physical appearance.
  • The data from the huge collection of marriages in England and Wales from 1837 onwards shows that people are matching very closely in marriage, and this consistency is not changing over time.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 028

Genetic Transmission and Social Mobility

  • The study finds that there is a strong correlation between social status and genetics, with people who share more genes having a higher likelihood of having similar social outcomes.
  • The study also finds that this correlation has not changed over the course of 400 years, suggesting that social mobility is limited.
  • The study uses data from lineage societies, such as the Guild of Freemen, to track genealogy over time.
  • The study examines other features of inheritance of status, such as the influence of mothers and fathers on children's outcomes, and finds that mothers and fathers play an equal role in social transmission.
  • The study uses data from marriage records to measure a sort of "meeting" of social status, and finds that people are matching very closely in marriage, and that this consistency is not changing in England all the way from 1837 till now.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 029

Assortative Mating and Social Mobility

  • Assortative mating, or the tendency for people to marry those who are similar to themselves in terms of social status, plays a role in social mobility.
  • If people were forced to marry at random, the rates of social mobility in British Society could almost double.
  • The study finds that people who share more genes have a higher likelihood of having similar social outcomes.
  • The study examines other features of inheritance of status, such as the influence of mothers and fathers on children's outcomes, and finds that mothers and fathers play an equal role in social transmission.
  • The study uses data from marriage records to measure a sort of "meeting" of social status, and finds that people are matching very closely in marriage, and that this consistency is not changing in England all the way from 1837 till now.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 030

The Study

  • The study examines the inheritance of social status over 400 years in England.
  • The study uses data from 425,000 people linked by descent and marriage to track genealogy over time.
  • The study finds a strong correlation between social status and genetics, with people who share more genes having a higher likelihood of having similar social outcomes.
  • The study also finds that this correlation has not changed over the course of 400 years, suggesting that social mobility is limited.
  • The study uses data from lineage societies, such as the Guild of Freemen, to track genealogy over time.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 031

Marriage and Social Status

  • The study finds that there is no sign of people marrying up or down based on social status.
  • People are marrying people of equal status on average.
  • The same pattern is observed for people at the top and bottom of the distribution.
  • People are marrying mainly on their kind of social status.
  • The study suggests that people are choosing to marry in this way because they have more information about someone's underlying status by talking to them for a short time.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 033

Social Status and Marriage

  • The study points out that historically, men tended to pair with women who have fathers with similar social status to themselves.
  • The study suggests that women will begin to pair with men who have fathers of similar status to themselves.
  • The study finds that there is a ranking of males as prospects in the marriage market and a ranking of women.
  • The study suggests that women will evaluate the education of their dat's father before deciding to commit to a date.
  • The study finds that there is a huge amount of information in the relatives of the people getting married that can predict for a given marriage how well the children are going to do in life.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 034

Conclusion

  • The study finds a strong correlation between social status and genetics.
  • The study suggests that people are choosing to marry in this way because they have more information about someone's underlying status.
  • The study finds that there is a ranking of males as prospects in the marriage market and a ranking of women.
  • The study suggests that women will evaluate the education of their dat's father before deciding to commit to a date.
  • The study finds that there is a huge amount of information in the relatives of the people getting married that can predict for a given marriage how well the children are going to do in life.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 035

Section 1: Cousin Marriage and Social Status

  • Cousin marriage is still common in some communities, such as the Middle East and South America.
  • People in these communities have limited choice in who they can marry.
  • Cousin marriages can result in more socially different outcomes than marriages between people of different social status.
  • If left to random chance, people would find someone closer to their family social status on the street than someone who is actually part of their own family.
  • This pattern of marriage is immediately apparent in 1837, even though most women did not have formal occupations at that time.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 037

Section 2: Marriage Patterns and Social Status

  • In 1837, most women in England were engaged in raising children, but still wanted someone of similar social position to marry.
  • The pattern of marriage in this society is surprising, as it suggests that social status plays a significant role in marriage decisions.
  • This pattern is also seen in other societies, such as Denmark, where social scientists come to study data on earnings and psychiatric medications.
  • Scandinavian countries are known for their strong social links, which can be traced across multiple marriages.
  • The correlation in outcomes like education is maintained even across five marriages in Sweden, indicating the strength of these social links.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 038

Section 3: Classism in England

  • England has a classist system, with words like "Posh" denoting social status and accent.
  • The school attended, grammar schools, and introduction of things like old boys clubs and gated communities are also prevalent in England.
  • The reason the speaker was interested in this study was to determine if the pattern seen in England is exclusive to that country.
  • Modern Denmark is often thought of as a high mobility society, but there is a study in Sweden that shows similar patterns in marriage and social links.
  • The study in Sweden found that people maintain a correlation in outcomes like education even across five marriages, indicating the strength of social links.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 039

Section 4: Social Links and Marriage

  • Social links are strong in both England and Sweden, with people maintaining a correlation in outcomes like education even across multiple marriages.
  • The study in Sweden found that people in Sweden are matching up in the same way in marriage as people in England.
  • The strength of social links in marriage is the same in England and Sweden, indicating that social status plays a significant role in marriage decisions.
  • The study in Sweden used a kind of panel of relatives to look at the connection between people across different marriages.
  • The data in Sweden shows that people maintain a correlation in outcomes like education even across five marriages, indicating the strength of social links.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 040

Introduction

  • The video is about a study that examines the inheritance of social status over 400 years in England.
  • The study uses data from 425,000 people linked by descent and marriage to track genealogy over time.
  • The study finds that there is a strong correlation between social status and genetics.
  • The study also finds that this correlation has not changed over the course of 400 years, suggesting that social mobility is limited.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 042

Inheritance of Social Status

  • The study examines the influence of mothers and fathers on children's outcomes and finds that they play an equal role in social transmission.
  • The study also finds that people who share more genes have a higher likelihood of having similar social outcomes.
  • The study uses data from lineage societies, such as the Guild of Freemen, to track genealogy over time.
  • The study finds that social mobility is limited and that social status is determined by genetics.
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark 043

You have read 50% of the summary.

To read the other half, please enter your Name and Email. It's FREE.


You can unsubscribe anytime. By entering your email you agree to our Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Watch the video on YouTube:
Is Social Status Determined By Your Genetics? - Gregory Clark - YouTube

Related summaries of videos: